Introduction to Ansible 2 – vol.1

Ansible

 

Ansible

Ansible is a radically simple IT automation engine that automates cloud provisioning,configuration management, application deployment, intra-service orchestration, and many other IT needs.

Designed for multi-tier deployments since day one, Ansible models your IT infrastructure by describing how all of your systems inter-relate, rather than just managing one system at a time.

It uses no agents and no additional custom security infrastructure, so it’s easy to deploy – and most importantly, it uses a very simple language (YAML, in the form of Ansible Playbooks) that allow you to describe your automation jobs in a way that approaches plain English.

On this page, we’ll give you a really quick overview so you can see things in context. For more detail, hop over to docs.ansible.com.

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OpenShift

OpenShift Origin installation over Fedora 19 (Mega Tutorial) – Part 7

OpenShift

OpenShift Origin

In this step of the tutorial let’s configure the system limits for the nodes, and also let’s configure GIT over SSH.

Let’s begin.
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OpenShift

OpenShift Origin installation over Fedora 19 (Mega Tutorial) – Part 4

openshift-origin-logo

OpenShift Origin

After the broker configuration in the previous post (installing packages and configuring gears), now it’s time to configure OpenShift core services through various plugins.

These plugins are responsible to manage authentication, updating DNS or messaging between nodes. Have their own config files, and also we have some sample files we can use as templates.

Let’s go. Continue reading

OpenShift

OpenShift Origin installation over Fedora 19 (Mega Tutorial) – Part 1

openshift-origin-logo

OpenShift Origin

Over several post I ‘ll show how to install OpenShift over Fedora 19.

This is the diagram:

1  “broker” machine with at least 1Gb of RAM y 10 Gb of HDD (I’ll do it over a virtual machine)

1  “node1” machine with at least 1Gb of RAM y 30 Gb of HDD (I’ll do it over a virtual machine too)

It can also be done on a single machine, but to better understand the behavior of each component is best done separately.

Let’s start.
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