Sabbatical

Relax…

Well, for a short time I shall have a sabbatical time with the blog.

Reasons? I’m going to get certified in OpenShift Enterprise, so I have to study, but have the advantage, right? 😛
But don’t worry, soon I will be here again, so while you can take a look to other posts like:
JBoss EAP as RHEL 7 service
JBoss EAP 6.2 RBAC – Part 1

See you soon.

OpenShift

OpenShift Origin installation over Fedora 19 (Mega Tutorial) – Part 7

OpenShift

OpenShift Origin

In this step of the tutorial let’s configure the system limits for the nodes, and also let’s configure GIT over SSH.

Let’s begin.
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OpenShift

OpenShift Origin installation over Fedora 19 (Mega Tutorial) – Part 4

openshift-origin-logo

OpenShift Origin

After the broker configuration in the previous post (installing packages and configuring gears), now it’s time to configure OpenShift core services through various plugins.

These plugins are responsible to manage authentication, updating DNS or messaging between nodes. Have their own config files, and also we have some sample files we can use as templates.

Let’s go. Continue reading

OpenShift

OpenShift Origin installation over Fedora 19 (Mega Tutorial) – Part 2

openshift-origin-logo

OpenShift Origin

Let’s continue with the tutorial and we’ll install MongoDB database which store all data about OpenShift infrastructure. After that we’ll install ActiveMQ messaging service who is responsible of communication between the broker and nodes. Finally let’s install MCollective client which is responsible of sending and receiving messages between the broker and nodes.

Let’s start.
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OpenShift

OpenShift Origin installation over Fedora 19 (Mega Tutorial) – Part 1

openshift-origin-logo

OpenShift Origin

Over several post I ‘ll show how to install OpenShift over Fedora 19.

This is the diagram:

1  “broker” machine with at least 1Gb of RAM y 10 Gb of HDD (I’ll do it over a virtual machine)

1  “node1” machine with at least 1Gb of RAM y 30 Gb of HDD (I’ll do it over a virtual machine too)

It can also be done on a single machine, but to better understand the behavior of each component is best done separately.

Let’s start.
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